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  • I'm from Spain, I study physics and mathematics and this blog is about music, movies, mathematics, science, art... Everything I find interesting or beautiful.
    Gostou? Reblogue isto!
    26, July, 2013
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    via cosmic-earthchild
    por thedragontrainer
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    26, July, 2013
    153 notes
    via madeinthesixties
    por kahuna68
    kahuna68:

Happy 70th Mick! (7/26/43) Time is still on your side!

    kahuna68:

    Happy 70th Mick! (7/26/43) Time is still on your side!

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    22, July, 2013
    285 notes
    via itsfullofstars
    por womeninspace
    womeninspace:

Sally ride sitting in front of the Stanford radio telescope, also known as the Dish. Ride earned her Bachelors degree, Masters degree and Ph. D. at Stanford University and studied, among others, astro physics.
Photo by Chuck Painter. (via kejames)

    womeninspace:

    Sally ride sitting in front of the Stanford radio telescope, also known as the Dish. Ride earned her Bachelors degree, Masters degree and Ph. D. at Stanford University and studied, among others, astro physics.

    Photo by Chuck Painter. (via kejames)

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    22, July, 2013
    171 notes
    via gravedisorder-deactivated201401
    por captainahabsrarebooks

    thedasbracket:

    captainahabsrarebooks:

    An original German film herald for Fritz Lang’s METROPOLIS (1927).  A serious rarity, and a lovely piece of original ephemera from the film.  (SOLD).

    I’ve got that too - not that rare though :p

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    22, July, 2013
    438 notes
    via visualizingmath
    por visualizingmath
    visualizingmath:

Visualization of the Infinite Series 1-2+3-4…
What is 1 - 2 + 3 - 4…? Before you read on, guess! 
In mathematics, 1 - 2 + 3 - 4 +… is the infinite series whose terms are the successive positive integers, given alternating signs. The infinite series diverges, meaning that its sequence of partial sums, (1, −1, 2, −2, …), does not tend towards any finite limit. Nonetheless, in the mid-18th century, Leonhard Euler figured out the sum of this infinite series, though a rigorous explanation wouldn’t arrive until much, much later. Leonhard Euler wrote what he admitted to be a paradoxical equation: 1 - 2 + 3 - 4… = 1/4.
The image above is a visualization of the terms and partial sums of 1 - 2 + 3 - 4 +… going out to the horizon.
The terms are indicated as black lines executing displacements to the camera’s right, plus a constant displacement away from the camera.
The partial sums are where the terms end; they are indicated as black circles.
The action takes place on an infinite horizontal plane. The integers are located on the gray lines. The horizon is picked out by a bluish sky.
So basically, it’s a horizontal graph of 1 - 2 + 3 - 4… with the first point being at zero. When you add one, it zig-zags up to positive one. Subtract two, and it zig-zags down to negative one. Add three, and it zig-zags up to positive two, and so on.
Now, look at the visualization and squint your eyes. See the graph as somewhat of a triangle. Imagine a straight line going down the center of that triangle…where is that line? If you thought, “about a quarter of the way between 0 and 1”, then you just figured out the sum of the infinite series 1 -2 +3 - 4…! Learn more about this method.

    visualizingmath:

    Visualization of the Infinite Series 1-2+3-4…

    What is 1 - 2 + 3 - 4…? Before you read on, guess! 

    In mathematics1 - 2 + 3 - 4 +… is the infinite series whose terms are the successive positive integers, given alternating signsThe infinite series diverges, meaning that its sequence of partial sums(1, −1, 2, −2, …), does not tend towards any finite limit. Nonetheless, in the mid-18th century, Leonhard Euler figured out the sum of this infinite series, though a rigorous explanation wouldn’t arrive until much, much later. Leonhard Euler wrote what he admitted to be a paradoxical equation: 1 - 2 + 3 - 4… = 1/4.

    The image above is a visualization of the terms and partial sums of 1 - 2 + 3 - 4 +… going out to the horizon.

    • The terms are indicated as black lines executing displacements to the camera’s right, plus a constant displacement away from the camera.
    • The partial sums are where the terms end; they are indicated as black circles.
    • The action takes place on an infinite horizontal plane. The integers are located on the gray lines. The horizon is picked out by a bluish sky.

    So basically, it’s a horizontal graph of 1 - 2 + 3 - 4… with the first point being at zero. When you add one, it zig-zags up to positive one. Subtract two, and it zig-zags down to negative one. Add three, and it zig-zags up to positive two, and so on.

    Now, look at the visualization and squint your eyes. See the graph as somewhat of a triangle. Imagine a straight line going down the center of that triangle…where is that line? If you thought, “about a quarter of the way between 0 and 1”, then you just figured out the sum of the infinite series 1 -2 +3 - 4…! Learn more about this method.

    Sum

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    22, July, 2013
    23 notes

    David Bowie - Aladdin Sane (1973)

    The name of the album is a pun on “A Lad Insane”. Although technically a new Bowie ‘character’, Aladdin Sane was essentially a development of Ziggy Stardust in his appearance and persona, as evidenced on the cover by Brian Duffy and in Bowie’s live performances throughout 1973 that culminated in Ziggy’s ‘retirement’ at the Hammersmith Odeon in July of that year. Moreover there was not the thematic flow on this album that was present on its predecessor. Bowie himself described Aladdin Sane as simply "Ziggy goes to America", most of the tracks being observations he composed on the road during his 1972 US tour.

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    21, July, 2013
    4,861 notes
    via prostheticknowledge
    por prostheticknowledge

    prostheticknowledge:

    The Formal Generators Of Structure

    Axonometric visual experiments by architects Stanley Tigerman & G. T. Crabtree - via Data Is Nature:

    Architect Stanley Tigerman’s‘The Formal Generators of Structure’ (Architecture & Urbanism Journal, 1975) explored the combinatorial use of rectilinear shapes to generate volumetric, optical and architectonic compositions. Spatial configurations of the square and cruciform are extruded to create axonometric projections reminiscent of the ‘ideal’ geometricism of the De Stijl school. They are also reminiscent of the works of Op-artists such as Albers and Vasarely who toyed with the square to infinity through structural multiplicity and chromatic modulation.

    A collection of images can be found at RBDRD here

    More at Data Is Nature can be found here

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    21, July, 2013
    2,641 notes
    via sagansense
    por ron-guyatt

    Planet Travel Posters Sets Mars & Venus by Ron Guyatt

    Deviant Art || My Store || Facebook || Twitter

    The Project:

    Space tourism is still a long ways off, but it’s not hard to imagine that someday, tourists will visit the natural geological landmarks of other worlds much like they tour the Grand Canyon, Mount Everest or Ayers Rock. Each of these great tourist destinations needs a classic retro travel poster to entice visitors. Until the day people settle off world and make their own destinations many of these may be the places that people will want to travel too. I hope that these posters can inspire people to think beyond our world to the limitless possibilities of the Universe.

    Posters Available at My Store

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    18, July, 2013
    159 notes
    via visualizingmath
    por visualizingmath

    visualizingmath:

    Apollonian Gasket Variations by Fdecomite

    In mathematics, an Apollonian gasket or Apollonian net is a fractal generated from triples of circles, where each circle is tangent to the other two. It is named after Greek mathematician Apollonius of Perga.

    An example of a simple Apollonian Gasket:

    Simple Apollonian Gasket

    By viewing the example, it may be simple to deduce the construction of an Apollonian Gasket, however, instructions can be found here in this wonderful Vihart video. Have fun creating your own Apollonian Gaskets!

    There’s another fractal hiding in one of these gaskets. Can you spot it?

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    18, July, 2013
    2,447 notes
    via kenobi-wan-obi
    por kenobi-wan-obi
    kenobi-wan-obi:


Sunday’s Scorcher by Alan Friedman

    kenobi-wan-obi:

    Sunday’s Scorcher by Alan Friedman

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    18, July, 2013
    955 notes
    via as-we-go-along
    por brain-d-a-m-a-g-e
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    11, July, 2013
    25 notes
    via christinetheastrophysicist
    por christinetheastrophysicist
    christinetheastrophysicist:

Supersymmetric glue: the search for gluinos

One of the biggest unanswered questions of particle physics is why the mass of the Higgs boson is relatively small when the Standard Model suggests a more natural value would be many thousands of trillions of times higher. We don’t know the answer to that question, but a popular proposed explanation invokes the idea of supersymmetry. Theories that include supersymmetry can very easily explain the Higgs boson’s low mass.
A theory that includes supersymmetry comes with a price. These theories predict that for every known particle, a cousin supersymmetric particle exists. These cousins have the same properties as the familiar ones, except they have a different subatomic spin. There’s only one problem. None of these cousins has been observed. The simplest form of supersymmetry has been definitively ruled out.
Read More.

    christinetheastrophysicist:

    Supersymmetric glue: the search for gluinos

    One of the biggest unanswered questions of particle physics is why the mass of the Higgs boson is relatively small when the Standard Model suggests a more natural value would be many thousands of trillions of times higher. We don’t know the answer to that question, but a popular proposed explanation invokes the idea of supersymmetry. Theories that include supersymmetry can very easily explain the Higgs boson’s low mass.

    A theory that includes supersymmetry comes with a price. These theories predict that for every known particle, a cousin supersymmetric particle exists. These cousins have the same properties as the familiar ones, except they have a different subatomic spin. There’s only one problem. None of these cousins has been observed. The simplest form of supersymmetry has been definitively ruled out.

    Read More.

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    11, July, 2013
    8,177 notes
    via blue-voids
    por blue-voids
    blue-voids:

Thierry Feuz - Atlas III, 2007

    blue-voids:

    Thierry Feuz - Atlas III, 2007

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    11, July, 2013
    54 notes
    via mathematica
    por mathmajik
    mathematica:

mathmajik:

More Martin Gardner Puzzle Love
So simple, but SO annoying!
Cut each of the four shapes into two identical pieces. The pieces can be mirror images of each other.

Someone?? Meep [CJH]
P.S. It took me forever, but if you get stuck — solutions!

    mathematica:

    mathmajik:

    More Martin Gardner Puzzle Love

    So simple, but SO annoying!

    Cut each of the four shapes into two identical pieces. The pieces can be mirror images of each other.

    Someone?? Meep [CJH]

    P.S. It took me forever, but if you get stuck — solutions!

    Gostou? Reblogue isto!
    11, July, 2013
    1,452 notes
    via itsfullofstars
    por fer1972

    fer1972:

    So Far from Home by Skinny Ships



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